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CAN WE STILL OBSERVE THE ZIMBABWE BIRD AS A SYMBOL OF THE NATION IF OTHER NATIONS ALSO HAVE THE SAME SYMBOLISM

18 Sep

Eagles have been used by many nations as a national symbol.

Copy of the stone bird of Zimbabwe

CAN WE MAKE THE ZIMBABWE BIRD A SYMBOL OF THE NATION IF OTHER NATIONS ALSO HAVE THE SAME SYMBOLISM,  THE MOST IMPORTANT THING IS THAT ZIMBABWEAN ANCESTORS OBSERVED THE ZIMBABWE BIRD THE SAME PERIOD  EUROPE, AMERICA AND OTHER COUNTRIES DID RECOGNIZE  Eagles as national symbols.

when colonials like Cecil Rhodes , came to Zimbabwe, they quickly observed the Zimbabwe bird as a national heritage, because the eagle was the symbol of coat of arms all over Europe and america

THE Zimbabwe bird, hungwe  also known as bateleur egale, ..

the real zimbabwe birdFile:Gaukler-01.jpg

File:Terathopius ecaudatus -San Diego Zoo-8a.jpg

the stone-carved Zimbabwe Bird is a national emblem of Zimbabwe, appearing on the national flags and coats of arms of both Zimbabwe and Rhodesia, as well as on banknotes and coins (first on Rhodesian pound and then Rhodesian dollar). It probably represents the bateleureagle.Citation Required The famous soapstone bird carvings stood on walls and monoliths of the ancient city of Great Zimbabwe built starting in the 11th century and continuing for over 300 years by ancestors of the Shona. The ruins, which gave their name to modern Zimbabwe, cover some 1,800 acres (7.3 km²) and are the largest ancient stone construction in Zimbabwe.

When the ruins of Great Zimbabwe were discovered by modern civilization in the late nineteenth century, five of the carved birds they found were taken to South Africa by Cecil Rhodes. Four of the statues were given to Zimbabwe by the South African government at independence, while the fifth remains at Groote Schuur, Rhodes’ former home in Cape Town.

The iconic stone carved Zimbabwe Bird is an emblem of Zimbabwe. It has appeared on the national flags and coats of arms for Zimbabwe and previously Rhodesia as well as on banknotes, coins and stamps. The bird is used by the national sports teams and is part of numerous badges and logos of various Zimbabwean institutions and organisations.

Zimbabwe BirdThe original birds, carved from soapstone in a unique and distinctive style once stood proudly on guard atop the walls and monoliths of the ancient city of Great Zimbabwe. The exact origins of this stone city are shrouded in mystery but it is believed to have been built sometime between the 12th and 15th centuries byancestors of the Shona. The word Zimbabwe is derived from the Shona words dzimba dza mabwe and means “house of stone”.

When the ruins of Great Zimbabwe were excavated by treasure-hunters in the late nineteenth century eight carvings of soapstone birds were unearthed. One bird was sent to Cecil Rhodes at his Groot Schuur home in Cape Town and, somewhat controversially, still remains there. This is the only bird not currently in Zimbabwe.

Four complete birds and a partial bird were sent to Rhodes separately and kept in South Africa but these were returned to Zimbabwe in 1981 after independence. Pieces of a sixth bird ended up in the hands of a German missionary who sold it to the Ethnological Museum in Berlin in 1907. The fragments were taken from Berlin to Leningrad when Russian forces occupied Germany at the end of the Second World War. They remained there until the end of the Cold War when they were returned to Germany.

In May 2003 the fragments of soapstone sculpture were handed back to President Robert Mugabe by a German museum. The eighth statue has always remained in Zimbabwe.Originally the birds are known to have stood on high pillars above the eastern enclosure of Great Zimbabwe and may have symbolised kings. There are two styles of bird, with slight differences in posture and shape of the pillar.

In the absence of any direct method of dating the birds, it is unclear whether this represents earlier and later styles, or whether there was any meaning to the differences.

The overall shape of the  birds suggests that they represent a bateleur eagle a bird with great significance in Shona culture. The bateleur or chapungu is a good omen, the symbol of a protective spirit and a messenger of the gods.

The Zimbabwe Bird is believed to be an ancestral link to the heavens and is sometimes called Shiri ya Mwari, the Bird of God. The stone eagle became the country’s emblem and symbol of freedom because it linked the Shona to their ancient ancestors.Legend has it that peace will never return to Zimbabwe until all the plundered Zimbabwe Birds have been returned to their homeland.

   The Great Seal of theUnited States.

Coat of Arms of Zimbabwe.svgZimbabwe

Albanian Kingdom   Coat of arms of Austria

Coat of arms of Egypt.Coat of arms of Germany

The Reichsadler symbol of the Holy Roman Empire of German Nation and Imperial Germany (1871-1918)

 

Coat of arms of Mexico. It dates back to the legend of the founding of the main Aztec city-state

Coat of arms of Poland.

Coat of arms of theRussian Federation.

Coat of arms of Velletri.

Ghana COA.jpgghana

Nigeria coat of arms.pngnigeria

Coat of Arms of Zambia.svgzambia

yeman

Coat of arms of Syria.svgsyria

Coat of arms of Iraq.iran

Coat of Arms of Indonesia Garuda Pancasila.svgindonisia

Coat of arms of Montenegro.svgmontenegro

Coat of Arms of South Sudan.svgSUDAN

EQUADOR

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One response to “CAN WE STILL OBSERVE THE ZIMBABWE BIRD AS A SYMBOL OF THE NATION IF OTHER NATIONS ALSO HAVE THE SAME SYMBOLISM

  1. Simon

    February 21, 2013 at 12:27 pm

    Point of correction, the Zimbabwe Bird is not a Bateleur Eagle (Gondo), it is the African Fish Eagle (Hungwe) which is in the same family the American Bald Eagle. The Hungwe bird features specifically in the Coart of Arms of Zimbabwe, Zambia, Namibia and South Sudan. It’s cousin (the Bald Eagle) features on the American Coart of Arms. It doesn’t matter what other nations observe, the Hungwe bird is part of our heritage and it is a symbol of our freedom.

     

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